Sea Kayaking

Kayaking

The first day of week two kayaking for the Nunatak group began at Nutgrove Bay.  This week we had two nominated students each day take on the role as guides.  The week was also focused on our skills in interpreting weather.  The well-known ‘Fish and Chipper’ trip was our plan for the day.  After getting on the water aided by a breeze, we had the quick trip to Constitution Dock, though experienced strong gusts on the trip back, while practicing our towing.

Day two was a calmer morning at Cornelian Bay.  We paddled down the Derwent along the Domain Highway and found shelter in coves along the way from the winds.  As a group we paddled under the Tasman Bridge and admired the scenery of Hobart and surrounds.  A lunch break again in Constitution Dock gave us shelter from the winds and we practiced some strokes in the calmer waters. We paddled through familiar waters down to Nutgrove Bay to conclude or day.

By Day three, the winds had eased further and we departed from Tinderbox Reserve and paddled north along the coastline towards Blackmans Bay. The scenery was superb with views of Dennes Point on Bruny Island.  As the location was unfamiliar to most, it a good experience to kayak in less known waters. We ended our day with the assistance in performing our first surf landings successfully.

Our final day of the week saw us have our most glorious weather yet.  Starting from Taroona Beach we all gathered up together in the water looking up to the Shot Tower where our guides provided some background information.  The gentle winds and seas helped make it an enjoyable experience for everyone as we also soaked in the spectacular Alum Cliffs.  Sitting outside of Kingston Beach we had spectacular views to kunanyi/Mt Wellington as we all sat and enjoyed the calm waters and mountain views.  The group then individually performed their own surf landing on Kingston Beach for a quick-lunch break, and in no time we were back on the water and kayaking past a few sea caves.  Before landing once again at Blackmans Bay, we all practiced our T rescues in the chilly water. We had yet another surf landing to end the day and some took the opportunity to practice their paddle float rescues.

A big thanks to Tom and Gemma for their time throughout the week.

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Adventure Tour Guiding : Sea Kayaking

The Nunatak Adventure Tour Guiding students who chose sea kayaking as their specialisation skill cluster, spent their first week learning basic paddling skills, deep water rescue techniques and how to interpret weather.

Our group of nine students and two teachers – Tom Keith, from Roaring 40ᴼS Kayaking and Gemma Gooley spent the first day in the classroom, then headed down to Short Beach in Sandy Bay for their first paddle.  After a quick briefing, the group paddled from Short Beach to the Hobart Waterfront and back.  With the wind picking up, there was also time for a quick skills session before heading back to TasTAFE.

The next day was spent at the Clarence Aquatic Centre, where the group had the chance to learn and practice a variety of vital rescue techniques, including the wet-exit; self-rescue with the aid of a paddle float and how to assist others back into their kayak from the water.

Unfortunately, the final day of class for the week was cancelled due to the extreme weather and flooding in Hobart, but the short introduction to Sea Kayaking Guiding left the class eagerly awaiting their next session on the water.

Thank you to our wonderful teachers and guides for the day!

Sea Kayaking

Over the past month our Certificate IV Adventure Guiding students have been focusing on their Sea Kayaking skills and spending time on the water.  The students spent time learning the basic skills of sea kayaking from the experienced Guides from Roaring 40’s Kayaking.  The lessons included learning skills such as forward and back paddle and quickly moving to more technical skills such as the draw stroke and self rescues.  The students also learnt the importance of how to guide and manage groups on the water in a range of conditions.

The students were able to experience some beautiful surrounding areas of Hobart including the Iron Pot Lighthouse and Cape Hauy on the Tasman Peninsula.  They also spent a wet and windy week on the water in the mouth of the Huon River.  It was their first overnight expedition paddling from Franklin to Dover over a four-day period.  Highlights of the week included watching sea eagles land in lofty nests, seals pose on sunny rocks, and chasing rainbows through sun showers.  It was also great to learn about marine mammals from Emma’s interpretation.

Graduate Profile : Hannah Ling

Where are you currently working?  The Sea Kayak Company in the Abel Tasman National Park, and Awarua Guides in Fiordland, New ZealandBut actually right now, I’m sea kayaking the west coast of Scotland with my partner and a great friend!!  Both of whom have done the TasTAFE Adventure Courses too!

What do you love most about your job?  Helping people reconnect with and appreciate the natural world around us, and seeing or at least knowing the positive flow on effects they experience from such interactions.  Also, I just love fresh air – I can’t spend too long in four-walled surroundings!

What training did you undertake with TasTAFE?  Certificate III  & Certificate IV in Adventure Guiding  in 2010 and Certificate IV in Outdoor Recreation in 2012.

What did you value about your training at TasTAFE?  Having the privilege to be taught and trained by the most experienced and passionate people in their fields!  Not to mention the fellow classmate legends, where amazing lifetime friendships were formed.

How has your training helped you with your Guiding career?  It really gave me a solid knowledge and experience base to build on and opened numerous doors of possibilities both locally and overseas!  Although, from my experiences and observations elsewhere, there really is no place like home!  For an enjoyable, safe and respectful workplace, where the company takes pride in caring for our greatest asset – the natural environment … Tasmanian guiding is where it’s at!

What is your most memorable moment you have experienced on a trip?  Too many to name!  But sharing the love of water with people and seeing them embrace our refreshing Tasmanian coastlines, rivers and lakes for the first time is always a favourite!  The joy that is brought to them and also to myself, is very satisfying.

If you could invite anyone on a trip, who would it be?  Anyone needing a breath of fresh air, to re-energise, redirect and/or excite them about life and the possibilities out there!

If you could give one piece of advice for someone contemplating a career in the outdoors, what would it be?  Say YES! Start living the dream!

 RTO Code: 60142

Winter Sea Kayaking

Sea Kayaking

Two weeks ago, the TasTAFE Certificate III in Outdoor Recreation students enjoyed a few days of sea kayaking around Hobart and it’s surrounds.

The weather was perfect and despite the cold nights, the cloudless days kept the students warm while performing deep water rescues, practicing our paddling strokes and guiding each other on the water.  Our first day at Kingston Beach saw ice on the high sand dunes but bliss out on the water where the sun was shining.

On our second day we enjoyed some floating fish and chips after paddling from Short Beach to the CBD and had some close encounters with the resident seal while we lunched. Our third day saw beautiful views of Alum Cliffs on our journey from Taroona Beach to Kingston and back.  Guest instructor Cody McCracken and long-time teacher Renee Harrington deserve a special shout out for their wonderful mentoring and location choices!

Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking Sea Kayaking

RTO Code:  60142

The Freycinet Sea Kayak Escapade

Freycinet

Last week eight TasTAFE Certificate IV Guiding students took to the luscious crystal clear waters of the Freycinet Peninsula with a goal to learn and teach, practice their newly formed sea kayak skills, form a cohesive bond with their fellow guides, and with the nature around them.

An enlightening and spectacular trip was had by all. The Peninsula offered astounding views, dolphins and seals, quivers of bird life thriving in the remarkable conditions, an evening Aurora Australis after exquisite entrees on the pristine beaches, well-managed campsites and a real get away with almost nobody to be seen.  A great learning experience, interpretation on many natural and human facets of the area and accompanied by inspiring teachers.

For four days and three starlit nights these budding guides proved their skills in the field as gourmet caterers producing three course meals every night, warm lunches and breakfasts just this side of decadence.  The culinary experience was fortified by fresh local scavenged snacks of Neptune’s Necklace beads of juicy seaweed fresh out of the ocean, and an evening of Calamari squid caught off the kayaks and fried up on the MSR stoves.

Days were spent being hovered over by inquisitive and majestic Wedge-tailed eagles, the sounds of cuckoos and pardalotes wheeling their carts in the campsites and the occasional thumps of larger native fauna.

This time of year brought the vibrant colours of wattles in flower, burning sun and the anticipation of whales calving in the warming surrounding waters.  Young seals spent time waving at the colourful group paddling through their neighbourhoods, while the sunsets and sunrises filled the skies every morning and evening with colours so vibrant and sharp they would make any cartilaginous fish such as the shark, seem toothless in comparison.

The Peninsula’s incredible beauty and millennia of rich history is owed to the Toorernomairremener people, part of the Great Oyster Bay Nation of 600-700 Aboriginal Tasmanians. During winter they would feed on the plentiful shellfish and marine vegetables of the area, travelling to the highlands of Ben Lomond during the Summer months to collect skins. Large shell middens scatter the coastal landscapes we paddled past. These are significant remains and testament to the sustainable management of the area by the Aboriginal people for thousands of years, sites that are protected by law and are today of great significance to their descendants.

The Freycinet Peninsula Escapade was a great success and we hope that anyone visiting this place will look after it, as it has been looked after for so long.

Sea Kayaking

Sea Kayaking at Freycinet

Sea Kayaking

Sea Kayaking at Freycinet

Sea Kayaking

Sea Kayaking

Trips Galore

Sea Kayakers

We have an incredibly busy week at TasTAFE with five trips currently out in the field.

Our Certificate IV in Guiding students left yesterday morning for the East Coast where they are currently demonstrating their sea kayaking skills on the Freycinet Peninsula.

We also have a group of mountain bikers in the North East; half of the Certificate IV Outdoor Recreation students are on their Raft Guides Course at Arm River, with the other half climbing and abseiling at Freycinet for the week.

Some of the Certificate III Outdoor Recreation students are on their Work Placements at Rosny College; Hobart College and Guilford Young College and the Certificate III in Guiding students are about to head out to Port Arthur for three days, focusing on convict heritage.

Needless to say our equipment store is very bare!